Rhinoceros

Rhinoceros Julian Starks Photography

Rhinoceros have horns on their noses rather than on top of their heads. The horns are made of thousands of compressed hairlike strands of keratin that continues to grow much like human fingernails and hair throughout their lifetimes. Males tend to have thicker horns and females have long, thinner ones. Because their eyes are on the sides of their heads, they are very nearsighted and will charge at anything until they are close enough to see what it actually is...watch out! They do, however, have extraordinary senses of smell and hearing.  Featured above is a mother and child pair of BLACK RHINOCEROS.

POPULATION STATUS CRITICALLY ENDANGERED: Black Rhinoceros are classified as critically endangered, largely due to their horns being sold on the black market for popular but ineffective medicine and hangover cures in China and Vietnam.